GERMAN ASSAULT RIFLE GERAT O6 NO. 2

GERMAN ASSAULT RIFLE GERAT O6 NO. 2
GERMAN ASSAULT RIFLE GERAT O6 NO. 2

With this rifle, derived from the MG-42, Germans carried out the first tests of rollers retarded blowback system, which made then the fame of H&K - 7.92mm caliber, manufactured by Mauser, Oberndorf, Germany in 1945 - Incomplete specimen of the Mauser prototype Gerat 06 - an attempt to simplify production of the standard Sturmgewehr - MP44 series. Weapon is the combined gas and roller retarded blowback system associated with the standard Gerat 06. Extensive use of sheet metal formed and stamped parts, and plastic is noted in its construction. Weapon has no buttstock. Weapon accepts standard MP43 type of 30-round detachable box magazine. This is only known specimen. Weapon has an overall length of 27 1/2" and a barrel length of 16". Bolt, mainspring and butt section are missing. AKA: Mauser Prototype Special Rifle (Gerat 06 No. 2). Cartridge: 7.9 Pistolen Patrone 43. Markings: Rear sight base: NR.2. Weapon transferred to the Museum on 17 November 1950. Notes: "ORIGIN: Developed by Altenberger in Mauser Abt. 37, during 1943 after a preanalysis. USE & DISTRIBUTION: An uncontracted Mauser plant development undertaken to compete in the Wa Pruf 2 Machine Carbine program of 1940, 1941, and 1942. Possibly only two or three specimens made for plant experimentation, rapidly giving way to the MKb Gerat 06. "U.S. Army Ordnance School" The Mauser Werke were historically significant ruins because this was the manufacturing and design complex where Peter Paul Mauser had created in the previous century his celebrated and much-copied Mauser bolt-action rifle. But history was not what had brought these American Ordnance men here. They were looking for the files and sample drawers of the Mauser Werke's Ordnance Experimental Shop. When they located them in the rubble, they found two new weapons - the Gerat 03 and Gerat 06. Both designs had been chambered for the 7.9-mm Infanterie Kurz Patrone round and both exhibited a number of unusual breech designs the team had never seen before. The two weapons were sent to Springfield Armory and examined with great interest by weapons designer Cyril Moore, who could only speculate on what these two automatic weapons might have done had Germany had time to put them in production. "William H. Hallahan" Gerat. A German-language term: "equipment". Sometimes it was used prior to 1945 as a distinguishing prefix for small-arms, but generally was indicative of a design that had not reached service - e.g. Gerat 06(H) and Gerat 040 were a Mauser-developed assault rifle and simplified pistol (Volkspistole) respectively." References: - Walter See, Musgrave & Nelson, The World's Assault Rifles, pg. 59. See, U.S. Army Ordnance School-Submachine Guns Volume I, pg. 53. References: Hallahan, William H. MISFIRE: THE HISTORY OF HOW AMERICA'S SMALL ARMS HAVE FAILED OUR MILITARY. Charles Scribner's Sons. N.Y., N.Y. 1994. Musgrave, Daniel D. & Thomas B. Nelson. THE WORLD'S ASSAULT RIFLES & AUTOMATIC CARBINES. Vol. II. T.B.N. Enterprises. Alexandria, Va. 1967. U.S. Army Ordnance School. SUBMACHINE GUNS VOL. I. Aberdeen Proving Ground. Aberdeen, Md. July, 1958. Walter, John. THE GREENHILL DICTIONARY OF GUNS AND GUNMAKERS. Stackpole Publications. Mechanicsburg, Pa. 2001.

Submitted by: Roger Desbois & REMOV