Type-100 Hyaku-shiki kikantanju

Type-100 Hyaku-shiki kikantanju

The Type-100 Hyaku-shiki kikantanju was a Japanese SMG used extensively during WW2, and the only submachine gun produced by Japan in any quantity. Designed and built by the Nambu Arms Mfg. Co., the Type 100 was a robust, if unremarkable, submachine gun that was first delivered to the Imperial Army in 1942. Japan was surprisingly late to introduce the submachine gun to its armed forces; the MP40 had been ubiquitous in the German Army since 1939. The Type 100 was a well made gun, albeit with several strange features, including a complicated ammo feed device that, for safety purposes, ensured that a round was completely chambered before firing, a complex system compounded by the curious bottleshaped round the Type 100 used. Atypically for a submachine gun, a bayonetlug was fixed under the barrel. Despite its shortcomings and complexities, the Type 100 featured sophisticated sights and a high quality chromeplated barrel to aid cleaning and reduce wear. Some models also featured a bipod or a complicated muzzlebrake. A number of Type 100 variants were produced during the course of the war; one with a folding stock for paras (few were made as the folding stock weakened the weapon's structure in combat) and a 1944 version that was greatly simplified in order to hasten production at a time when Japan was being pushed into retreat across the Pacific theatre and demand for submachine guns was at an all time high. The 1944 variant was slightly longer, featured simple iron sights. Corners were cut in production, leaving many Type 100s with roughly finished stocks and poorly welded parts. Despite these simplifications, Japan lacked the industrial infrastructure to produce sufficient quantities of the Type 100 to stem the rapid allied advance. By 1945, 30,000 had been built, a comparatively low number to the 1,300,000 plus Tommyguns built by the US. Caliber: 8x22mmNambu Rate of fire: 800rpm Magazine: 30rounds weight: 4,4kg(loaded)

Submitted by: Cesare & REMOV