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  #1  
Old 05-04-2006
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Default Could be trivia but....

actually, I would just like any info I can get on this old thing. My Grandfather (turned 101 years old last January) gave this old Shotgun about 25 years ago. At that time he told me that his grandfather had givin it to him and that he thought it to be about 110 years old at that time (now it would be 135). It is not a wire-twist. It fires modern (2 and a half inch 12 gauge) (I only use light loads in it)
Here is the only inscription on it: J.Stevens A&T Co. - Chicopee Falls, Mass. U.S.A. - (and here is the kicker, where it usually says Pat's pending, it says) Pat's.Appl'd. For
Over-all length is 48in(4ft). Bbl length is 32in. One bbl is full choke. It is all original except for one screw holding the right hammer in place.

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File Type: jpg StevensShotgun3.jpg (59.5 KB, 4 views)
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  #2  
Old 05-05-2006
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PT-The Italian Commie PT-The Italian Commie is offline
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Cool Stevens shotgun...

...well, I am not a big expert of them, but STEVENS is an "historic" shotguns maker in the US, so you will surely find something out sooner or later. But you would better check outside of the Web for some real firearms historian (that's what you need if the shotgun is really over 120-y-o).
As far as I can see, the weapon is well preserved, and the fact itself that it is still working (and firing moder 12-gauge loads) is a further point on its favour. I think you could sell it for some good price, if you'd ever want, but even if not, if I was in you, I'd have it evaluated.
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Old 05-05-2006
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Not to pick on your English, PT, but "if I was in you" would probably work better as "if I were you" . Has fewer sexual connotations and all that.

That's a pretty sweet ass looking shotgun. All class.
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Old 05-05-2006
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Default re: evaluation

Yes, that was my intent. To have it evaluated and a value on it. I've been trying to find someone, anyone, that can tell me what it's monotary worth is for 25 years. I've taken it to gun shows, and "gun experts" and none of them will even guess at it. They say because of that "Pat's. appl'd. For" they can't even begin to guess. I've had several offers from those that go to those old Cowboy Shoots (& some of those offers were pretty good!).
BTW, it shoots real sweet!. Hardly any kick to it but, it does jump up.
Another small show this weekend in Tulsa, guess I'll see what I can find there.
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Old 05-05-2006
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I'll do you one better-- I know it.
What you've got is a Stevens model 235 hammered double barrel-- unlike later models, this one had barrels over 28", splinter fore end, and accentuated curls for the hammer arms. The phrase "patent applied for" generally turns up on guns manufactured between 1880 and 1890.
Stevens early years ran from 1864 and 1886, before hooking up with Sears, pended between 1886 and 1913--and then combining with Savage in 1923--Stevens guns made from 1864 to 1886 will be marked J. Stevens &co. From 1886 to 1916 they were marked J. Stevens A & T Cc or J. Stevens arms & tool Co.
Serial numbers would help, but on a bet I'd say yours was manufactured toward 1889 for the pistol grip stock and screws.
I think as much because of a change in design allowing Stevens to also manufacture the model 89 Sharpshooter using similar set screws. The stock is important because of attempts to "Americanize" gun design.
To a value, looking at the stock, barrels, bluing, and reciever--you have two things going for you--
The condition of the wood is fair and shows all original parts.
The major downside is the replacement screw.

I would not shoot anything above the current loads you're using. Even light field loads might cause a barrel to crack.

The advantage to it being manufactured before 1896 is you don't need a licensed dealer to sell it since it's below .50cal and a recognized antique. As such, according to BATF rules, as long as it is a recognized by state law (and since you're not in California), sale can be managed between private individuals.

In the long run you're most likely going to find the best bet in selling it to an antiques dealer or collector. As firearms NRA grade goes it's "good condition" at best. The wood is still solid and there's no material wear as far as my eye can tell-- the checkering is nicely preserved and the butt pad looks intact. But at best you'd be looking at 200-400 dollars in it's current condition.
Restoring would be an option--bluing, stock sanding/staining, replacing the screw-- and you'd be looking at near 800-900.

Personally?
I'd get a nice shadow box for it and hang it over my mantle.
I have a model90 Winchester (1890 production) in .22wrf that was given to me by a man whom I consider a surrogate grandfather. I keep it in one such display case as I slowly restore it.
I don't think e-gunparts.com may have anything-- but you could call them for a recommendation for where to look to get a atleast a replacement screw.
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Old 05-05-2006
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I thought the most common 12 gauge calibers were 2 3/4", 3", and 3 1/2" ?
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Old 05-06-2006
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Kthulhu, you are right...that was my mistake..I meant 2 & 3 quarters.
Armorer, That is excellent! Thanks very much for the info! I'm not sure about your pricing of it though. I've turned down offers of $ 1200.00 and $1000.00. Could be they didn't know what they were looking at either though, and, that was a few years ago.
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Old 05-06-2006
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I was speaking from a practical buyer's perspective. I've had people look at my m90 and make offers from 50 up to 1,500 for it.
The fortunate thing is you don't have damascus barrels-- many times people buy old shotguns with'em and find out the hard way that the lines produced by folded steel and age make for explosive results.
And while modern ammunition isn't as corrosive as old loads, plastic debris from wadding will foul up the bore.
I would not suggest trying any of the mock cowboy ammunition out there-- true, the paper hulled stuff would function better, but I worry about the expansion cracking a barrel. get some shooters choice-- it's a bore cleaner that lacks a lot of the more corrosive compounds found in stuff like Butches' b=Bore shine and Hoppes.
Sulpher content in the metal can be weakened using heavy scrubbers-- the Shooter's choice however is much gentler and will wick out any corrosion when used with a nylong brush.
One last note--
you said one barrel is full choke-- what is the other? Modified or improved mod?
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Old 05-06-2006
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Armorer, it's modified. All I ever shoot out of it these days is light loads, dove shot. And then I use a bore snake after every few rounds. About onjce a year I soak everything excapt the furniture in Lamp oil.
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Old 05-06-2006
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Winchester universals might be better-- won't pattern for crap, but it'll take a wing or two. Main reason is the laods are thin rifenhauser shells with a simple cardboard plug and wax leaflet for a wad and cup. Upsaide is you're not sacrificing FPS and still dropping the chamber pressure.
Also less recoil!
I would advise against using a boresnake for one simple reason: you don't want to score the surface. Thin walls and corrosion are a bad mix.
Furthermore it won't get out all the fouling of modern plastic residue. In eight years of competitive shotgun sporting, I've tried just about every cleaning gimmick.
My shotgun cleaning equipment on older shotguns is still a bore guide, nylon brush, shooter's choice and a run of swatches.
I have really come to like the V-80 oil by inhibitor-- my skin ate the nickle plating off a beretta teknys and leaves perfect thumbprints in rust on barrels.
For moving parts I use Slip 2000-- doesn't dry out like Kriol and doesn't draw dust like RemOil.
As to wood...try Scotts Liquid Gold. Really brings out the grain and fills in dings beautifully. Try it and give us a pic brother-- I'll bet a buffalo nickle she dresses up beautifully.
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